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Review – The Portal December 11, 2012

Posted by thehypermonkey in 5 stars, Sci-Fi.
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Title: The Portal

Author: Alan Zendell

Publisher: FeedBrewer, Inc.

Publication Date: March 21, 2011

ASIN: B004TBC4DW

Available at: Kindle Barnes and Noble

From Goodreads:

Harry Middleton is born in an America staggered by a century of decline, a time of medical and technological marvels beyond the reach of most people in a shattered economy. Pessimism and despair are more common than optimism and hope, and a desperate government bets the future on space.  The lunar and Martian colonies have not provided the hoped-for salvation, so despite an angry, disillusioned public, the first star mission will soon be launched.

Harry is a special child, smart, precocious, his only confidante an embittered grandfather.  When the old man dies, Harry is lost, until he meets Lorrie.  At thirteen, they bond, certain they’ll spend their lives together, but a year later, she disappears, and Harry is desolate.

With help from his friend Carlos, Harry begins a quest to find her, but he quickly learns how powerless he is.  Even the police lack the resources to help.  Harry and Carlos can only depend on themselves and each other.  An unlikely duo, Harry is an academic prodigy while Carlos is a stud athlete.  Realizing that school and baseball are their  tickets out of the morass they’re caught in, they inspire each other to greatness in both.

Trying to move on with his life, Harry has a college sweetheart, but as long as Lorrie haunts him, he knows the relationship is doomed.  He gains celebrity and wealth, but the thing Harry wants most, finding and saving Lorrie from whatever fate took her from him remains beyond his reach.  And always, in the background, are the deteriorating state of the country and the coming star missions.

And of course, there’s the Portal.

Review: *A free copy of this book was given in return for an honest review.

This book basically chronicles the life of Harry Middleton during the 22nd century. It centers around his high school sweetheart Lorrie Grissom who disappeared when he was just fifteen. He spends a lot of resources searching for her and she’s never really far from his mind.

I’m a huge baseball fan. Huge. Naturally when baseball came up in this book I was thrilled. Futuristic baseball! Harry’s baseball career starts young and is an integral part of his life. His boyhood friend Carlos is also a baseball player and together they become a team.

Carlos was a rough around the edges type of guy. He was incredibly street smart. Harry drove Carlos to do better at his studies while Carlos drove Harry to do better athletically. They complimented each other extremely well. After Lorrie went missing, Carlos and Harry became inseparable.

The decline of America that the book shows is staggering. It shows itself all through the book. It made me wonder if that’s where we’re really heading. At the same time, the book shows the resiliency of the American spirit. Despite the dismal conditions,  Americans still fought to keep their country great.

This book made me look at the future differently. I look at it with a bit of hope and with a bit of dread. Either way, I enjoyed this book tremendously and it’s something I hope to reread in the future.

5 Stars_Star Rating System

Review – What’s Left of Me October 12, 2012

Posted by thehypermonkey in 4 stars, Sci-Fi.
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Title: What’s Left of Me

Author: Kat Zhang

Publisher: HarperCollins

Publication Date: September 18, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0062114877

Available at: Amazon Kindle Barnes and Noble

From Goodreads:

I should not exist. But I do.

Eva and Addie started out the same way as everyone else—two souls woven together in one body, taking turns controlling their movements as they learned how to walk, how to sing, how to dance. But as they grew, so did the worried whispers. Why aren’t they settling? Why isn’t one of them fading? The doctors ran tests, the neighbors shied away, and their parents begged for more time. Finally Addie was pronounced healthy and Eva was declared gone. Except, she wasn’t . . .

For the past three years, Eva has clung to the remnants of her life. Only Addie knows she’s still there, trapped inside their body. Then one day, they discover there may be a way for Eva to move again. The risks are unimaginable-hybrids are considered a threat to society, so if they are caught, Addie and Eva will be locked away with the others. And yet . . . for a chance to smile, to twirl, to speak, Eva will do anything.

Review:

In an America where the citizens are born with twin souls, Eva and Addie should have settled into one soul by the time they were twelve. But Eva doesn’t want to fade. She wants to see a thousand sunsets, experience a first kiss, and watch her little brother grow up. So Addie and Eva keep Eva’s presence a secret.

The relationship between Addie and Eva is special. They’re closer then sisters by necessity and by love. They help each other in ways too many to enumerate. When they do argue the silence between them afterwards is hard for Eva to bear. There are problems in their relationship as you can imagine. Eva can’t move or speak but she never once takes it out on Addie. The danger of being found out is a strain on both of them. I always got the feeling that Addie only started letting Eva try to move and speak reluctantly. It was as if she was forced to relinquish control and didn’t think there was ever a real possibility of Eva gaining it.

Ryan and Devon, on the other hand had a much different relationship. While Devon was dominate, Ryan was still able to control the body when he wanted to. There was no fighting for the use of the body. They were in much better harmony.

The America that Addie and Eva lived in wasn’t a friend to hybrids like themselves. In fact, it systemically weeded out hybrids as much as possible. Hybrids were public enemy number one. The Great World Wars were with other countries that allowed hybrids freedom. This America stood on its own against those countries.

There wasn’t a moment in this book when the action let up. It was pretty much non-stop. There was always something happening in rapid succession. I thought this was a good thing though. It kept things exciting and I loved it. I didn’t think the pace of the book was too fast or too rushed.

I really liked how complete this book felt. There was no cliffhanger to contend with. Everything wrapped up nicely enough within one book yet there was enough of an opening for another. This is book one in what I hope is a series but is most likely a trilogy. I can’t wait for the next book, but I’ll just have to wait!

Review – What's Left of Me October 12, 2012

Posted by thehypermonkey in 4 stars, Sci-Fi.
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Title: What’s Left of Me

Author: Kat Zhang

Publisher: HarperCollins

Publication Date: September 18, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0062114877

Available at: Amazon Kindle Barnes and Noble

From Goodreads:

I should not exist. But I do.

Eva and Addie started out the same way as everyone else—two souls woven together in one body, taking turns controlling their movements as they learned how to walk, how to sing, how to dance. But as they grew, so did the worried whispers. Why aren’t they settling? Why isn’t one of them fading? The doctors ran tests, the neighbors shied away, and their parents begged for more time. Finally Addie was pronounced healthy and Eva was declared gone. Except, she wasn’t . . .

For the past three years, Eva has clung to the remnants of her life. Only Addie knows she’s still there, trapped inside their body. Then one day, they discover there may be a way for Eva to move again. The risks are unimaginable-hybrids are considered a threat to society, so if they are caught, Addie and Eva will be locked away with the others. And yet . . . for a chance to smile, to twirl, to speak, Eva will do anything.

Review:

In an America where the citizens are born with twin souls, Eva and Addie should have settled into one soul by the time they were twelve. But Eva doesn’t want to fade. She wants to see a thousand sunsets, experience a first kiss, and watch her little brother grow up. So Addie and Eva keep Eva’s presence a secret.

The relationship between Addie and Eva is special. They’re closer then sisters by necessity and by love. They help each other in ways too many to enumerate. When they do argue the silence between them afterwards is hard for Eva to bear. There are problems in their relationship as you can imagine. Eva can’t move or speak but she never once takes it out on Addie. The danger of being found out is a strain on both of them. I always got the feeling that Addie only started letting Eva try to move and speak reluctantly. It was as if she was forced to relinquish control and didn’t think there was ever a real possibility of Eva gaining it.

Ryan and Devon, on the other hand had a much different relationship. While Devon was dominate, Ryan was still able to control the body when he wanted to. There was no fighting for the use of the body. They were in much better harmony.

The America that Addie and Eva lived in wasn’t a friend to hybrids like themselves. In fact, it systemically weeded out hybrids as much as possible. Hybrids were public enemy number one. The Great World Wars were with other countries that allowed hybrids freedom. This America stood on its own against those countries.

There wasn’t a moment in this book when the action let up. It was pretty much non-stop. There was always something happening in rapid succession. I thought this was a good thing though. It kept things exciting and I loved it. I didn’t think the pace of the book was too fast or too rushed.

I really liked how complete this book felt. There was no cliffhanger to contend with. Everything wrapped up nicely enough within one book yet there was enough of an opening for another. This is book one in what I hope is a series but is most likely a trilogy. I can’t wait for the next book, but I’ll just have to wait!

Review – Journey to Hart’s Halo October 10, 2012

Posted by thehypermonkey in 3.5 stars, Sci-Fi, Young Adult.
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Title: Journey to Hart’s Halo

Author: Lou Hood

Publisher: we(e)press

Publication Date: January 20, 2012

ASIN: B0070YHQCE

Available at: Kindle

From Goodreads:

JOURNEY TO HART’S HALO is a near-future fantasy adventure, set in 2033 on the world’s first international space colony.

The project of eccentric technology billionaire Dr. Oliver Hart, Hart’s Halo is about to be populated by Zero Colony. Space-crazy twelve year old Davey Randolph’s dream is to win two of the twelve spots, for him and his mom, in a global lottery to spend five years aboard the Halo.

Constructed as a puzzle-propelled mystery, Davey needs the help of an international cast of clever and quirky pre-teens, and to conquer his own feelings of being an outsider, to solve the puzzles that will lead to a shocking discovery about the true fate of his missing father.

With new quantum physics from The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, futuristic technology, and space travel and habitation, it is a modern myth of epic scale.

Review:

Davey Randolph has Halotisis. He’s desperate to get on Hart’s Halo. He even enters the Hart Lottery by hacking into his mother’s email account. What he never dreamed of was winning the lottery! Now, thanks to his puzzle solving skills, he’s on his way to the space colony itself!

This was a fun book. I didn’t think I’d get so engrossed in it. The puzzles were fun. Davey was cute and so was Grace, his young friend. There was nothing new about a space colony but the puzzles did keep it fresh. Somehow Hood managed to keep the story going despite the recycled plot as well.

The characters were endearing and I think that’s what really drives the story. Davey was a good kid with a lot of smarts. He wasn’t aware of how smart he was which made him all the more appealing. He wasn’t particularly geeky either. He just liked puzzles and learning. Neither was Davey particularly mature for his age like most authors make out young characters to be in books these days. He acted his age and it was fun.

His friend Grace was the same way. She acted her age and they both had a lot of fun. There were some sobering moments as well. I didn’t respond to them as well as I did the lighter moments. But the kids reacted as I would expect they would.

The end plot was a little crazy. It was backed by a little too much by hard talking science that I found a little hard to take. It was basically introduced in conversation and it amounted to a monologue by one of the characters with only interjections of “Cool!” by the other participants. If you’re not into science you may not be too interested in it. I just kind of skipped it.

The book ended a bit too abruptly for me. I suppose it’s because there’s going to be a series.  I would have liked a bit more closure though. I felt like it was a bit too rushed.

I had a fun time with this book. The puzzles were inventive. The characters were fresh. I look forward to seeing where Lou Hood takes this series.

Review – Journey to Hart's Halo October 10, 2012

Posted by thehypermonkey in 3.5 stars, Sci-Fi, Young Adult.
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Title: Journey to Hart’s Halo

Author: Lou Hood

Publisher: we(e)press

Publication Date: January 20, 2012

ASIN: B0070YHQCE

Available at: Kindle

From Goodreads:

JOURNEY TO HART’S HALO is a near-future fantasy adventure, set in 2033 on the world’s first international space colony.

The project of eccentric technology billionaire Dr. Oliver Hart, Hart’s Halo is about to be populated by Zero Colony. Space-crazy twelve year old Davey Randolph’s dream is to win two of the twelve spots, for him and his mom, in a global lottery to spend five years aboard the Halo.

Constructed as a puzzle-propelled mystery, Davey needs the help of an international cast of clever and quirky pre-teens, and to conquer his own feelings of being an outsider, to solve the puzzles that will lead to a shocking discovery about the true fate of his missing father.

With new quantum physics from The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, futuristic technology, and space travel and habitation, it is a modern myth of epic scale.

Review:

Davey Randolph has Halotisis. He’s desperate to get on Hart’s Halo. He even enters the Hart Lottery by hacking into his mother’s email account. What he never dreamed of was winning the lottery! Now, thanks to his puzzle solving skills, he’s on his way to the space colony itself!

This was a fun book. I didn’t think I’d get so engrossed in it. The puzzles were fun. Davey was cute and so was Grace, his young friend. There was nothing new about a space colony but the puzzles did keep it fresh. Somehow Hood managed to keep the story going despite the recycled plot as well.

The characters were endearing and I think that’s what really drives the story. Davey was a good kid with a lot of smarts. He wasn’t aware of how smart he was which made him all the more appealing. He wasn’t particularly geeky either. He just liked puzzles and learning. Neither was Davey particularly mature for his age like most authors make out young characters to be in books these days. He acted his age and it was fun.

His friend Grace was the same way. She acted her age and they both had a lot of fun. There were some sobering moments as well. I didn’t respond to them as well as I did the lighter moments. But the kids reacted as I would expect they would.

The end plot was a little crazy. It was backed by a little too much by hard talking science that I found a little hard to take. It was basically introduced in conversation and it amounted to a monologue by one of the characters with only interjections of “Cool!” by the other participants. If you’re not into science you may not be too interested in it. I just kind of skipped it.

The book ended a bit too abruptly for me. I suppose it’s because there’s going to be a series.  I would have liked a bit more closure though. I felt like it was a bit too rushed.

I had a fun time with this book. The puzzles were inventive. The characters were fresh. I look forward to seeing where Lou Hood takes this series.

Review – The Selection September 26, 2012

Posted by thehypermonkey in 4 stars, Romance, Sci-Fi.
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Title: The Selection

Author: Kiera Cass

Publisher: HarperTeen

Publication date: April 24, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0062059932

Available at: Amazon Kindle Barnes and Noble 

From Goodreads:

For thirty-five girls, the Selection is the chance of a lifetime. The opportunity to escape the life laid out for them since birth. To be swept up in a world of glittering gowns and priceless jewels. To live in a palace and compete for the heart of gorgeous Prince Maxon.

But for America Singer, being Selected is a nightmare. It means turning her back on her secret love with Aspen, who is a caste below her. Leaving her home to enter a fierce competition for a crown she doesn’t want. Living in a palace that is constantly threatened by violent rebel attacks.

Then America meets Prince Maxon. Gradually, she starts to question all the plans she’s made for herself–and realizes that the life she’s always dreamed of may not compare to a future she never imagined.

Review:

I instantly fell in love with America Singer. She was one of the sweetest characters I’ve read this year. Yet she also had a deceptively strong backbone that most people wouldn’t immediately see. I admired America’s ability to play so many different instruments as well.

What to say about Aspen. I loved him in the beginning of the book. I thought he was sweet and dreamy. He had a hard time being a Six. He sacrificed a lot for his family. He also struggled with the fact that America made more money and had more then he did. I tried to understand that and forgive him for that, but I thought it was silly male pride. It was Aspen’s idea to have America enter the Selection. I also still can’t decide if having America enter the Selection was the silliest thing or the most selfless thing to do. He also became a little presumptuous in my opinion. He started thinking he knew what was best for America and that grated on my nerves. Maybe if he returns in later books he’ll have more of a chance to redeem himself.

The Selection itself was an interesting book. It reminded me a lot of a reality show with sci-fi elements. I really enjoyed it a lot more then I expected to because of the sci-fi elements. They weren’t everywhere but there were enough of them to keep the story fresh.

Prince Maxon was like a breath of fresh air after Aspen. He didn’t pressure America. He was also a bit awkward at times in his own way. You could tell that he didn’t have much experience with women. Despite that he managed to win his way into my heart or maybe it was because of that. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about him.

I should warn you there’s a huge love triangle in this book. It’s done fairly well but it’s not the best of the best. In other words I’m not a huge fan of it. I’m still going to read the next book because I’m curious to see who America ends up picking and how the selection goes. This is still a great book to read.

Review – Defiance September 25, 2012

Posted by thehypermonkey in 4 stars, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, Young Adult.
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Title: Defiance

Author: C.J. Redwine

Publisher: Balzer + Bray

Publish Date: August 28, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0062117182

Available at: Amazon Kindle Barnes and Noble

From Goodreads:

Within the walls of Baalboden, beneath the shadow of the city’s brutal leader, Rachel Adams has a secret. While other girls sew dresses and obey their male Protectors, Rachel knows how to survive in the wilderness and deftly wield a sword. When her father, Jared, fails to return from a courier mission and is declared dead, the Commander assigns Rachel a new Protector, her father’s apprentice, Logan–the same boy Rachel declared her love for two years ago, and the same one who handed her heart right back to her. Left with nothing but a fierce belief in her father’s survival, Rachel decides to escape and find him herself. But treason against the Commander carries a heavy price, and what awaits her in the Wasteland could destroy her.

At nineteen, Logan McEntire is many things. Orphan. Outcast. Inventor. As apprentice to the city’s top courier, Logan is focused on learning his trade so he can escape the tyranny of Baalboden. But his plan never included being responsible for his mentor’s impulsive daughter. Logan is determined to protect her, but when his escape plan goes wrong and Rachel pays the price, he realizes he has more at stake than disappointing Jared.

As Rachel and Logan battle their way through the Wasteland, stalked by a monster that can’t be killed and an army of assassins out for blood, they discover romance, heartbreak, and a truth that will incite a war decades in the making.

Review:

I have to admit, I’ve been looking forward to the release of this book for awhile. To my consternation I found that it was written in alternation points of view, Rachel’s and Logan’s.  I wasn’t sure how it was going to work out, but to my surprise it worked out well and I came to enjoy it.

Rachel is a sixteen-year-old girl who has suddenly come under the protection of Logan. I didn’t take to her immediately. She seemed a bit too petulant and sulky. The more I read the more I liked her though. What I took to be petulant and sulky was actually humiliation. She had professed her love to Logan when she was fifteen and he had rejected her. Who wouldn’t be humiliated? As the book went on, there were moments I became impatient with her but I think she was just acting like any sixteen-year-old would have done in such impossible situations.

What I loved about Rachel the most was how she was such a kick-ass warrior in such an oppressed misogynistic society. She was a fiercely independent woman in a culture that stressed that women were nothing more then chattel. I think it spoke volumes to have such a strong heroine. And she showed a lot of soft emotions as well showing you don’t have to be a one-dimensional person.

I loved Logan! He was absolutely gush and crush-worthy. He’s smart and kind. He takes his responsibilities seriously and he always tried his best with Rachel despite the animosity she felt and showed towards him in the beginning of the book.  I loved Logan’s inventions. The mix of inventor and warrior was too sexy to resist.

What I loved about Rachel and Logan the most was how their love evolved. It grew from mutual circumstances and time spent together. No insta-love here! There was a lot of give and take too. Although there was one point I felt Logan got a bit too needy. Maybe that’s just me. That was towards the end of the book. I don’t want to give too much away.

The Commander was one of the most evil tyrants I’ve come across. He made a great bad guy. He was just someone you love to hate. The Cursed One was a fantastic monster. It reminded me of a wyrm. Together they added some great tension to the book.

There’s enough resolution to leave you satisfied in the end. Yet there’s also an opening for more books in the future. It’s a well done ending to a very good book. I did have one pet peeve. Only I can’t mention it without giving away a spoiler. Needless to say something was repeated endlessly and I got tired of the repetition. That’s all I can say. It was something I was able to brush off though.

Review – Conspiracy of Angels September 21, 2012

Posted by thehypermonkey in 4 stars, Mystery/Thriller, Sci-Fi.
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Title: Conspiracy of Angels

Author: Laurence MacNaughton

Publisher: NLA Digital Liaison Platform LLC

Publish Date: June 14, 2012

ASIN: B008BN8D9I

Available at: Kindle Barnes and Noble

From Goodreads:

Just out of prison, ex-convict Mitch Turner is determined to put his life back on track and find out the truth about his daughter’s mysterious death. But when his daughter’s best friend, Geneva, discovers a cryptic piece of top-secret technology, the two of them are thrust into the cross-hairs of a deadly living weapon.

It’s known only by a code name: Archangel. It’s fast, invulnerable, inhuman. And its next target is Mitch.

But the Archangel is more than just a relentless killer. It’s a gatekeeper of the dangerous boundary that divides this world from the next. And it’s Mitch’s only chance of learning the dark truth about his daughter’s fate.

Outnumbered, outgunned and on the run, Mitch and Geneva race to outsmart an elite force determined to silence them. Can they uncover the conspiracy before the Archangel unleashes its deadly secret on all of humanity?

Review:

Mitch recently got out of prison and he’s still coping with his daughter’s death. All he’s trying to do is walk the straight and narrow when he runs across Geneva. She entangles him in a conspiracy of epic proportions.

Mitch was someone I immediately liked. He was down to earth with a rough exterior. He was street smart and savvy. Mitch had an air about him that indicated he was a man who took care of his business. His actions proved that to be true as well. When Geneva threw him in the thick of things he got things done. He took care of her and he earned her trust. Not an easy task.

Geneva lost her parents to the Archangel. She trusts no one. Her one mission in life is to kill the Archangel. I admired her determination and her spunk. She also showed a soft side that I appreciated and felt was natural and realistic to the situation. Her bond with Mitch was my favorite part of the book. It wasn’t romantic. It was something more.

Michael was a complex character. I was constantly trying to figure out his motivations. His actions confused me. It wasn’t until near the end of the book that the mystery of Michael was revealed. I didn’t mind that I was so confused by Michael. It was just another mystery to be solved in a book full of mysteries.

The book really was full of mysteries. Was the copy boy really a copy boy? What really was the Archangel? How did Mitch’s daughter die? Why did the Archangel kill Geneva’s parents? What was the mysterious black box?

The only thing I didn’t enjoy was the end of the book. I found it chaotic and rather overblown. I can see how it would fit the genre, but it just didn’t suit my tastes. I’m sure many people would disagree and seeing as how I don’t normally read this genre I’m probably judging too harshly. There was another issue I had with the end, but I can’t discuss it without giving away a spoiler so I’ll keep mum.

On the whole, this was a very good read. The action was high energy. The characters were well-developed. The plot, while not new, still seemed fresh. If you’re looking for a thrill-ride this wouldn’t be a bad choice.

*A free copy of this book was provided via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Review – The Lost Girl September 19, 2012

Posted by thehypermonkey in 4.5 stars, Sci-Fi, Young Adult.
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Title: The Lost Girl

Author: Sangu Mandanna

Publisher:  Balzer + Bray

Publish Date: August 28, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0062082312

Available at: Amazon Kindle Barnes and Noble

From Goodreads:

Eva’s life is not her own. She is a creation, an abomination—an echo. Made by the Weavers as a copy of someone else, she is expected to replace a girl named Amarra, her “other”, if she ever died. Eva studies what Amarra does, what she eats, what it’s like to kiss her boyfriend, Ray. So when Amarra is killed in a car crash, Eva should be ready.

But fifteen years of studying never prepared her for this.

Now she must abandon everything she’s ever known—the guardians who raised her, the boy she’s forbidden to love—to move to India and convince the world that Amarra is still alive.

What Eva finds is a grief-stricken family; parents unsure how to handle this echo they thought they wanted; and Ray, who knew every detail, every contour of Amarra. And when Eva is unexpectedly dealt a fatal blow that will change her existence forever, she is forced to choose: Stay and live out her years as a copy or leave and risk it all for the freedom to be an original. To be Eva.

From debut novelist Sangu Mandanna comes the dazzling story of a girl who was always told what she had to be—until she found the strength to decide for herself.

Review:

Eva is an echo. She was created to take the place of Amarra if she were to ever die. Eva’s life is spent studying Amarra’s life and following the Loom’s strict laws. She knows at any moment her familiars or the family that she belongs to could execute a Sleep Order on her which would end her life.

From the very beginning this book draws you in. The plot itself is wholly engaging and as I learned about Eva’s life my sympathy for her grew. She was so trapped by the laws confining an echo. What stolen pleasures she had were precious and few. I admired her need to define herself individually. She had desires apart from her life as an echo. In this way she rebelled against the laws that governed her life. Eva also showed a lot of strength in adversity.

I liked Sean a lot but I kind of wondered why one of her guardians became so intimate with her. I thought that the people in charge would have had better sense then that. It made for a good story though. So while Sean was really conscious of obeying some of the laws, yet he was willing to bend other rules. He picked his battles. Although I thought that he should have been  His respect of her need to have an identity that wasn’t an echo of Amarra was what made me like him the most.

I loved this book. It was fast paced and I became really invested in the characters. In the end I was only disappointed with the fact that the follow up book hasn’t been released yet.

Review – Queen of Chaos July 20, 2012

Posted by thehypermonkey in 4 stars, Sci-Fi.
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Title: Queen of Chaos

Series: Sequoyah Trilogy, Book Three

Author: Sabrina Chase

Publication Date: September 2012

Publisher: Worlds Away Press

Available at: Worlds Away Press

 Summary:

With Seqouyah in imminent danger of attack from Toren, Moire Cameron has no time to for Crabs. Crabs is what she has to deal with though and more then she had bargained for.

How will she deal with Toren when she has to deal with the Crabs as well?

Review:

Queen of Chaos lived up to its title. It was just a little chaotic. Not to the point of bewilderment or anything, but just enough to keep things interesting and exciting. There was the ceeyo of Kulvar to deal with, there were the Crabs, Toren, and Fleet. All of them wanted a piece of Moire. It added up to a spicy mix of adventure and mayhem.

It took me much longer to read this last book of the trilogy. I wanted to savor it and prolong the experience. It was hard to do since it was so action packed. There were fights in space stations, fights in space, and fights planetside. It was hard to put this book down.

The Crabs were explored further in this book and they were an extremely interesting addition. They had a big purpose as well as being very intriguing as not only a race but as a culture. I liked how in-depth the author went with them.

The fights in space were so much fun. The descriptions of the ships were so well done I could easily imagine myself there or watching as if in a movie. I bet George Lucas would have so much fun with this!

If there’s one flaw it’s the characters. Although they stayed true to form in this book, they weren’t further developed in this book. They didn’t seem to grown. There is one scene where Ennis confides in Moire about something of his past. That seems to give him more dimension. Everything else is static. Moire still struggles with her position as leader. Alan is still a man-child. I would have liked to have seen more character development.

Taken for the whole, the book was very good though. I just wish I could keep reading about this wonderful world.